A Closer Look at Spaulding's Rehab Team

A Closer Look at Spaulding's Rehab Team

A Closer Look at Spaulding's Rehab Team

In a unique setup that dates back to a chapter founder doubling as the director of the rehab program at Boston’s Spaulding Rehab Hospital, the…

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SH-SCI Healthcare Lecture Series

SH-SCI Healthcare Lecture Series

Healthcare lectures for those with Spinal Cord Injury

As part of our Model System of care, we are striving to provide the best quality of information to our patients. In these efforts, we…

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Spring Adaptive Sports

Spring Adaptive Sports

Another great season ahead for Adaptive Sports!

With warmer weather comes another great Spring/Summer season of Spaulding's Adaptive Sports program!

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Learn More about SH-SCI Research

Learn More about SH-SCI Research

Are you interested in learning more about what is happening at SH-SCI?

To learn more about research happening at SH-SCI - please contact us via our web form. We are happy to answer your questions!

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Improving Bone Health in SCI - Comparative Trial

Improving Bone Health in SCI - Comparative Trial

This study compares FES Rowing and Zoledronic Acid on bone loss in SCI.

People with serious spinal cord injuries run a high risk of bone fractures. This study aims to see if adapted rowing, using electrical stimulation of…

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Sclerostin and Bone Loss

Sclerostin and Bone Loss

Sclerostin is being investigated as a biomarker for bone loss in patients with SCI

This study looks at bone health in people with SCI to determine the relationship between certain proteins and bone loss during the acute phase of…

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Exercise and Breathlessness

Exercise and Breathlessness

Breathlessness (dyspnea) can result in decreased ability to perform ADLs or other activities - such as exercise.

Exercise and Breathlessness (SRH) In chronic SCI, muscular weakness and paralysis result in a decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), and a…

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Non-Invasive Stimulation for Pain After SCI

Non-Invasive Stimulation for Pain After SCI

Researchers are looking at the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on pain.

This study is investigating a non-invasive method of brain stimulation (Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation- tDCS) for the relief of pain due to a previous spinal…

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Breaking News

According to NBCNEWS: One person will kick the ball on Thursday but seven others will be watching in wheelchairs. In May, two women became the seventh and eighth people to control the exoskeleton. The first woman walked “a total of 132 steps, to the awe of everyone present,” Nicolelis recalled.

 

He said they rehearsed the kick twice at the stadium and it has worked. However, it's possible something might go wrong during the ceremony and Nicolelis will have his heart in his mouth knowing what’s coming.

 

But most of those watching around the world won’t guess what they’re about to see; a small miracle, a giant leap for mankind and the most amazing kick of the whole World Cup.

 

Paralyzed from the waist down, a young Brazilian will rise from his wheelchair, walk a few steps and kick the tournament's first ball.

 

What to read more? Click here to read the full story courtesty of NBCNews:

 

Paraplegic to Kick Off Soccer World Cup After Medical Miracle

 

 

Adaptive Sports Program

The Adaptive Sports Program at SH-SCI provides therapeutic recreational activities – including sailing, rowing, bicycling, and skiing – for members of the disabled community. Our trained staff identifies activities most appropriate for each participant. For more information, please click here.

 

The Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) of Massachusetts also offers many selections for adaptive sports and summertime activities. Check out their brochure below!

 

icon DCR Universal Access Brochure

News

Knowledge In Motion - Eating Well to Prevent and Manage Secondary Conditions in SCI

 

Our most recent Knowledge In Motion (K.I.M.) Lecture has been posted on the web! 

 

 

On June 5th the Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System and the New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center Model System hosted a lecture and webcast featuring Joanne Smith B.A., BRT Dip, CNP and Kylie James B.Sc. (OT), CNP. They discussed the important role nutrition plays in restoring balance to your body, which enhances your body’s natural ability to heal and helps protect you from developing potentially life-threatening secondary health complications. Joanne Smith and Kylie James co-authored “Eat Well, Live Well with Spinal Cord Injury” to address the unique needs of people with SCI. This presentation includes case studies to demonstrate the positive changes that proper nutrition can have on certain conditions, such as bowel dysfunction and pressure sores.

 

 

Our attendees left with an understanding of the therapeutic role nutrition plays in the rehabilitation and long term health of individuals with SCI, and how nutrition can positively impact your independence in an easy, practical, and cost effective way.  They also became informed about the specific nutrients that can help prevent, manage, and address bowel dysfunction and pressure sores, in addition to the importance of nutritional supplementation.

News (continued)

Podcast in Sports Participation for those with SCI

 

Former Spaulding Resident, Dr. Cheri Blauwet, has given a recent podcast on the relationship between Sports participation for individuals with SCI and employment status. She talks about her recently published article, where she found that participation in organized sports was positively associated with employment.  To listen to this podcast, please follow this link: http://www.physiatry.org/blogpost/1045767/172389/Sports-Participation-Individuals-with-Spinal-Cord-Injury-SCI

 

Current Research Publications

  • Related Articles

    Neurotoxic or Neuroprotective? Current Controversies in SCI-Induced Autoimmunity.

    Curr Phys Med Rehabil Reports. 2013 Sep;1(3)

    Authors: Saltzman JW, Battaglino R, Stott H, Morse LR

    Abstract
    Controversy exists regarding the autoimmune response that has been observed following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is not clear if this represents a protective response by the immune system to prevent further tissue damage, a pathological reaction of the immune system to central nervous system antigens released by the injury, or a combination of both. Experimental evidence indicates that B cells produce auto-antibodies following SCI and that the presence of self-reactive antibodies is associated with tissue damage. Conversely, other studies suggest T cell activity at the site of the injury promotes tissue regeneration. Vaccination with dendritic cells exposed to central nervous s [...]

National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Our Spinal Cord Injury Model System is funded by the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). NIDRR is a component of the Department of Education - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) whose main mission is helping to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities.

 

National SCI Database

The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from an estimated 13% of new SCI cases in the U.S.  As part of the SCI Model System, SH-SCI contributes to this database. The NSCISC has recently released 2013 "Facts and Figures" from the National Database.

NSCISC - Facts and Figures 2013

Knowledge Translation Center

Connect with the Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center
The Model System Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) has many resources available about the Spinal Cord Injury Model System, including helpful flyers and handouts about injury - and also the contact information for Model System sites nationwide.

On their website, they  list information for both consumers, and clinicians - including publications from the national sites. The MSKTC can also be found on Blogspot and Facebook.

Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System

SCI Resource of the Month

July 2014: Traveling and SCI

Traveling can be stressful for anyone, especially for someone who hasn’t traveled since their injury. It is common to be apprehensive about air-travel, the accessibility of accommodations and transportation. With proper planning, these concerns can easily be avoided and controlled. Knowing what to expect from the time an airline reservation is booked to the moment the flight touches down will help you avoid a potential setback. There are many travel agencies available that are experienced or specialize in accessible accommodations.  In our resource article linked, we provide information on travelling after an SCI and the variety of accessible accommodations currently available.

Additional pamphlets on other topics may be found in our "Patient Handouts" section of the website. 

icon SCI Resource of the Month July 2014